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Wednesday, May 26, 2010

People Are Crazy

On PowerLine: People Are Crazy
"... the Europeans are post-Christian in this sense, too: they have tried to "liberate" themselves from the curse of Adam by substituting borrowing for working, and from the curse of Eve by not having children. It was entirely foreseeable that neither of these efforts would end well."

(h/t Agent Intellect)

4 comments:

MK said...

Perhaps that should be rephrased to "leftists" or "socialists" are crazy, given it's their ideology is the one that's failed and will always fail.

It's sad how Europe has gone though, they rejected their Christian heritage and God and now they wander around lost and without any hope or much of a future.

Ilíon said...

Myslef, I'd have said, "people are perverse," for that seems to me the underlying problem: most people want to assert (and/or to possess) 'A' and 'not-A' simultaneously.

America isn't too far behind Europe on that sad and downward slope. Americans may be more "religious" or more "spiritual" in general than Europeans, but only a minority are actually Christian.

Crude said...

Give me pagans over post-christians any day. Pagans can be conversed with. Post-christians spend a lot of time making sure conversation is impossible.

Oh, and I added a blog of my own, Ilion, and added you to the list. Do you know if there's a way to pre-approve only select commenters without giving them flat-out post access on the blog?

Ilíon said...

I presume you mean genuine pagans (and they're all in the jumgles), since the (neo-)pagans are merely people who have combined their rejection of Christianity with play-acting.

Congratulations on starting a blog. And thanks for adding mine to your blogroll.

So far as I can tell, the only control that the Blogger sortware allows you over whether individuals are allowed to post to your blog is if among the settings you choose the fourth Settings/Comments/Who_Can_Comment? setting (“Only members of this blog”); myself, I’d go for the second setting (“Registered users”) to weed out “Anonymous” (but that’s mainly because I find the “Anonymous” non-identity to be annoying, especially when there are multiples of them.)

I’ve seen references to “third-party” methods of banning individuals; but have not read more deeply about it. So far, just deleting all trace of comments by the unwelcome persons -– declining them even the perverse pleasure of my merely acknowledging that they exist -- is working for me.

Other blogging software gives the user some control in this regard, but those platforms have their own imperfections.